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Poster: Electric Wallpaper Date: Feb 9, 2004 2:15pm
Forum: prelinger Subject: Re: broadcast licencing programs made with Prelinger materials

I would be interested in hearing what you've learned since you posted this question. I also am working on a doc (being pitched to the CBC also) that utilizes Prelinger clips heavily. My solution would be to tell the broadcaster that I will go to Archive Films and get licensed BetaSP versions of the clips and splice them into my master and charge them accordingly for doing so. If they want things done a certain way, they are going to have to pay for that. That's the reality of broadcast television.

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Poster: james dean martin Date: Feb 10, 2004 5:34am
Forum: prelinger Subject: Re: broadcast licencing programs made with Prelinger materials

hello electric wallpaper

I haven't learned much; nobody else has replied. I did hear that programs under 5 minutes are less likely to need documentation, which helps me but probably not you.

I can tell you that I sold two shorts to CBC and all they wanted in the way of docs was the 'music cue sheets'.

Have you seen 'the corporation'? That sucker was rife with Prelinger footage, and my tech guy saw instances of 'artifacting' (digital faults) in the footage indicating it may have been taken off the website as well.

I'll conclude by mentioning that it says somewhere on the internet archive website that they do not provide any 'tape versions' of the stuff available for download, so you might be out of luck there, even with a fistful of dollars.

I once called the agency that represents prelinger for stock footage and they'd never heard of the website. They quoted the ususal astronomical fees for any footage that was going to broadcast.

good luck and keep in touch

p.s. are you in toronto?

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Poster: Electric Wallpaper Date: Feb 10, 2004 10:36am
Forum: prelinger Subject: Re: broadcast licencing programs made with Prelinger materials

james dean martin wrote:

>Have you seen 'the corporation'? That sucker
>was rife with Prelinger footage, and my tech
>guy saw instances of 'artifacting' (digital
>faults) in the footage indicating it may have
>been taken off the website as well.

I haven't seen "the Corp" yet. Artifacts are one thing we will have to live with in our case, since we just don't have the budget to purchase better quality, licensed copies.

>I'll conclude by mentioning that it says
>somewhere on the internet archive website
>that they do not provide any 'tape versions' of
>the stuff available for download, so you might
>be out of luck there, even with a fistful of
>dollars.

I think what they're trying to say is that they do not supply tape versions, but that Getty Images does, so don't call us, call Getty instead.

>I once called the agency that represents
>prelinger for stock footage and they'd never
>heard of the website. They quoted the ususal
>astronomical fees for any footage that was
>going to broadcast.

Yes, I contacted them as well. I understand the reasons for the costs being as high as they are. There is a lot of expense involved in archiving, researching, dubbing and shipping footage. I think though, that they should give the ambitious producer a break if he/she can use this site for researching which clips they need. For example, at this point, I could send them a rough cut of my film and a shotlist of the film clips and approximate times and they could dub off the necessary scenes. This would be far easier than having them pull and ship 60 films on VHS.

BTW, it looks like I will have to take Rick out for dinner too, since my doc uses about 15 minutes of vintage films. He'll be getting a big, wet kiss in the credits.

>good luck and keep in touch
Has your clip aired on Zed?

>p.s. are you in toronto?

Yes, as a matter of fact, I am.

Barry Silverthorn
Documentary Producer
The End of Suburbia; Oil Depletion and the Collapse of the American Dream

This post was modified by Electric Wallpaper on 2004-02-10 18:36:09

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Poster: james dean martin Date: Feb 11, 2004 5:23am
Forum: prelinger Subject: Re: broadcast licencing programs made with Prelinger materials

hi again wallpaper
Good to see some policy clarification from Rick Prelinger- thanks Rick.

Barry, if you figure out a better way to double the 'image size' of the files while minimizing the (jaggedy edges?); please let me know. I've had acceptable success with 'flaskMPEG' freeware which I found referenced in the Prelinger FAQs. But I run PC.

I thought 'The Corporation's' archive footage looked better (less jaggedy) than mine has on big screens at film fests, but my tech guy Darryl thought it was about the same quality. BTW, some of the corps biggest laughs came with the prelinger footage sections.

My 'ephemeral melange' flic has not yet aired on CBC, but it is on their website:(http://zed.cbc.ca/go.ZeD?CONTENT_ID=54354&FILTER_KEY=113943&page=content).
The compression they chose does not do the quality any favours, but they paid for it!

Good luck with your project; I'd love to go to any advance screenings. Feel free to put me on the email out list: brian@youandmedia.com

brian smith
www.youandmedia.com

p.s. I've selected, downloaded and burned 250 of these Prelinger movies onto CD-Rom. I can't stop!!

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Poster: Administrator, Curator, or StaffRick Prelinger Date: Feb 10, 2004 6:14am
Forum: prelinger Subject: Re: broadcast licencing programs made with Prelinger materials

"The Corporation" did indeed use a lot of footage from the online archives. I haven't yet seen it, but Mark Achbar and several others from Vancouver who've used the collection took me out for a wonderful dinner last November as a way of saying thanks. I believe they may also have licensed material from Getty -- I don't know.

The way licensing works, from our point of view, is that anyone who is in a position to use footage they download in a new work can do ahead and do so. If someone wants a license agreement in which we make representations and warranties, and indemnify them as to their usage of our material, they have to go to Getty and pay. The same is true if they want access to a high-quality physical element, such as a DigiBeta. By this "two-tier" licensing system, my household's able to eat, and our archives can continue to grow.

I speak with people at Getty all the time about the online collection, and they don't seem to have a problem with it. One reason may be that our sales are up, and many commercial clients contact them asking to license something that they have seen online.

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